Voting

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Re: Votes

Postby Stronger » Wed Jun 07, 2017 1:53 pm

Chauchat 1915 LMG

The Chauchat, named after Colonel Louis Chauchat, the main contributor to its design, was the standard machine rifle or light machine gun of the French Army during World War I (1914–18). Its official designation was "Fusil Mitrailleur Modele 1915 CSRG" (in English: "Machine Rifle Model 1915 CSRG"). Beginning in June 1916, it was placed into regular service with French infantry, where the troops called it the FM Chauchat.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chauchat

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Re: Votes

Postby Stronger » Wed Jun 07, 2017 1:54 pm

Fedorov Avtomat

The Fedorov Avtomat (also anglicized as Federov,[3][4] Russian: Автомат Фёдорова) or FA was an automatic rifle, designed by Vladimir Grigoryevich Fyodorov in 1915 and produced in the Russian Empire and later in the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. A total of 3,200 Fedorov rifles were manufactured between 1915 and 1924 in the city of Kovrov; the vast majority of them were made after 1920. The weapon saw combat in World War I, but was used more substantially in the Russian Civil War and in the 1939–1940 Soviet-Finnish war.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedorov_Avtomat

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Re: Voting

Postby Stronger » Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:32 pm

Gewehr 1888

The Gewehr 88 (commonly called the Model 1888 commission rifle) was a late 19th-century German bolt action rifle, adopted in 1888.

The invention of smokeless powder in the late 19th century immediately rendered all of the large-bore black powder rifles then in use obsolete. To keep pace with the French (who had adopted smokeless powder "small bore" ammunition for their Lebel Model 1886 rifle) the Germans adopted the Gewehr 88 using its own new M/88 cartridge, which was also designed by the German Rifle Commission. The rifle was one of many weapons in the arms race between the Germanic states and France, and with Europe in general. There were also two carbine versions, the Karabiner 88 for mounted troops and the Gewehr 91 for artillery. Later models provided for loading with stripper clips (Gewehr 88/05s and Gewehr 88/14s) and went on to serve in World War I to a limited degree. Unlike many German service rifles before and after, it was not developed by Mauser but the arms commission, and Mauser was one of the few major arms manufacturers in Germany that did not produce Gewehr 88s.

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Re: Voting

Postby Stronger » Fri Jul 14, 2017 10:51 am

Lebel Model 1886 rifle

The Lebel Model 1886 rifle (French: Fusil Modèle 1886 dit "Fusil Lebel") is also known as the "Fusil Mle 1886 M93", after a bolt modification was added in 1893. It is an 8 mm bolt action infantry rifle that entered service in the French Army in 1887. It is a repeating rifle that can hold eight rounds in its forestock tube magazine, one round in the transporter plus one round in the chamber. The Lebel rifle has the distinction of being the first military firearm to use smokeless powder ammunition.

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:48 pm

Winchester Model 1895

The Winchester Model 1895 is a lever-action repeating firearm developed and manufactured by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company in the late 19th century, chambered for a number of full-size military and hunting cartridges such as 7.62×54mmR, .303 British, .30-03, .30 Army, .30-06, .35 Winchester, .38-72 Winchester, .40-72 Winchester and .405 Winchester.

The Model 1895 was the first Winchester rifle to feature a box magazine located underneath the action instead of the tubular magazine design, which had remained fundamentally unchanged from the Winchester 1866. This allowed the rifle to safely chamber military and hunting cartridges with spitzer (pointed) bullets. The M1895 was also the last of the lever-action rifles to be designed by John Browning, and featured a rear locking bolt as in his previous designs dating back to the Winchester 1886. The M1895 is the strongest lever-action rifle Winchester has produced, designed to handle the increased pressures generated by the more powerful smokeless powder cartridges entering common use at the time of its introduction.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_1895

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Sat Oct 07, 2017 5:07 pm

Ultimax 100

The Ultimax 100 is a Singapore-made 5.56mm light machine gun, developed by the Chartered Industries of Singapore (CIS, now ST Kinetics) by a team of engineers under the guidance of American firearms designer L. James Sullivan. The weapon is extremely accurate due to its constant-recoil operating system. It is considered one of the most lightweight machine guns in the world.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultimax_100

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Sat Oct 07, 2017 5:11 pm

Frommer Stop

The Frommer Stop is a Hungarian long-recoil pistol manufactured by Fémáru-, Fegyver és Gépgyár (FÉG) (Metalware, Weapons and Machine Factory) in Budapest. It was designed by Rudolf Frommer, and its original design was adopted as the Pisztoly 12M in 1912, created for the Royal Hungarian Army. The handgun was manufactured in various forms from 1912 to 1945 and used in the Hungarian Armed Forces. The Stop is 165 millimeters (6.5 in) long with a 95 millimeters (3.7 in) 4-groove rifled barrel. Unloaded weight is 610 g (22 oz), and the detachable box magazine holds seven rounds.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frommer_Stop

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:03 pm

AN-94

The AN-94 is a rifle of Russian origin. The initials stand for Avtomat Nikonova model of 1994, after its chief designer Gennadiy Nikonov who previously worked on the Nikonov machine gun.

The AN-94 was designed as a potential replacement to the AK-74 series of rifles currently in service with Russian Armed Forces. Due to complex design and expense, its adoption has been very slow and it is in limited use, and it most likely will never become general issue. As of March 2013, the AK-74M is still the general issue rifle used by the Russian Armed Forces, with production of the AN-94 ceasing in 2006.

The stated great advantage of the AN-94 system is its ability to delay the recoil force until the fired round/s have left the barrel. This, it is claimed, enables more 'hits' on target under the most adverse combat conditions.

The AN-94 offers a unique two-shot burst function at a stated 1800 rounds per minute rate of fire. The Nikonov mechanism fires the second shot in the burst quickly enough to allow it to escape before the recoil of the first shot is felt, thus potentially allowing the two shots to hit extremely close together, for example to aid in piercing body armor.[citation needed]

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN-94

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:07 pm

Steyr M1912

The Steyr M1912, also known as the Steyr-Hahn, is a semi-automatic pistol developed in 1911 by the Austrian firm Steyr Mannlicher, based on the mechanism of the Roth–Steyr M1907. It was developed for the Austro-Hungarian Army and adopted in 1912. "The M1912 is an excellent pistol, strong and reliable," and was able to endure the adverse conditions of trench warfare during World War I.

The M1912 was originally chambered for the 9mm Steyr round, but after Germany annexed Austria in 1938, the Wehrmacht ordered 60,000 M1912 pistols rechambered to 9mm Parabellum which remained in service until the end of World War II.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steyr_M1912

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Re: Voting

Postby Tavor » Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:09 pm

Heckler & Koch P9

The HK P9 is a semi-automatic pistol from Heckler & Koch in 9×19mm Parabellum and the first to use a variation of H&K's roller delayed blowback system in a pistol format and polygonal rifling now common in H&K designs. Design began around 1965 and production ran between 1969 and 1978. Only 485 single-action P9's were produced and were discontinued in 1970. A traditional double action version, the P9S (the S standing for Spannabzug, or "double-action trigger") was manufactured in greater numbers.

More on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckler_%26_Koch_P9

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